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Connect showcase in Cornwall

01 July 2008

Connect was delighted to host the Access to Life in Cornwall forum, an event to showcase the work undertaken between the Access to Life project and the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly NHS Primary Care Trust and other community and voluntary organisations.

Forum discusses aphasia services in Cornwall

The event attracted a host of prestigious speakers, including Professor Roger Boyle CBE, National Director for Heart and Stroke at the Department of Health.

Professor Roger Boyle

Professor Roger Boyle speaking at the Access to Life Forum

Maggie Scott, Consultant Nurse for Stroke in Cornwall, said: “Today has been about showcasing the work we’ve been doing with Connect and Access to Life.

'Every patient who has a stroke has a different experience and therefore different needs. The Life after Stroke Pathway means we can tailor care to each individual, working with specialist stroke-skilled teams, Adult Social Care and the voluntary sector.'

Nigel Stephens works for Cornwall County Council’s Adult Social Care department and also has aphasia, following a stroke.

He said that events such as the Access to Life Forum are critical for raising awareness of the disability and building strong relationships with health and social care to improve services to people who survive stroke.

Nigel spoke about the realities of living with aphasia and of the lack of awareness of aphasia in the world around us.

Nigel Stephens speaks about his experience of aphasia

Nigel Stephens works for Cornwall County Council's Adult Social Care department and also has aphasia

Andrew Cozens, Strategic Health Adviser for Children and Adult Health Services at I&DEA, spoke about the importance of creative commissioning and person-centred care using shared ideology.

Margaret Green had the room in silence as she talked about her experience of aphasia during the eight years since her stroke. 'I used to sing, now, no more. I have to learn to live a new life.'

Maggie Scott, Consultant Nurse for Stroke in Cornwall, said: 'Today has been about showcasing the work we’ve been doing with Access to Life. Every patient who has a stroke has a different experience and therefore different needs. The Life after Stroke Pathway means we can tailor care to each individual, working with specialist stroke-skilled teams, Adult Social Care and the voluntary sector.'

Kate Mitchell, project manager for Access to Life, said: 'Today’s Forum has been a tremendous success in raising awareness of aphasia and communication disability.

It’s been incredibly positive and effective working with the Primary Care Trust and we’re looking forward to many more steps forward in improving care after stroke.'

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Margaret Green talking about her aphasia

Margaret Green

VIEW VIDEO CLIP

See a video of part of our work with the Access to Life in Cornwall Project